Siblings on Pedal Bikes

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Siblings on Pedal Bikes

from 5.00

We encourage families to bring older siblings on pedal bikes without training wheels to the clinic. Mixed-age spaces are invaluable and are more conducive to children’s learning than age-segregated play.

We are committed to making our Balance Bike Clinics available regardless of ability to pay. If you need it, simply select the scholarship option that your family is able to do and pay what you can. If you don't need to use the scholarship option, the clinic costs $50.

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Children have far more to learn from playmates who differ from themselves in age and ability than from those who are at their same developmental level. Young children learn from older ones even when they are not interacting with them. They learn just from watching and listening. From such observations children acquire not just information but also motivation. Children seem to be most motivated to do what those who are a little older than themselves are doing. Five-year-olds aren’t particularly interested in emulating adults; adults are too far ahead of them, too much in a different world, to be effective models for 5-year-olds. But 5-year-olds do very much want to be like the cool 7- and 8-year-olds they see around them. And the 7- and 8-year-olds want to be like the 10-year-olds. And so on.

Age mixing also benefits older children at least as much as it benefits younger ones. Interactions with younger children allows older ones to be the mature partners in relationships and to practice nurturance and leadership. Age mixing also allows older children to learn through teaching. In mixed-age play, older children often find themselves in the position of explaining concepts to younger ones. To teach any concept, one must first clarify it in one’s own mind, to put it into words that the learner can understand. In the process of such clarification, the teacher may gain a more solid understanding of the concept than they had before. The requirement for clarification may be present especially in cases where the status or authority differences between teacher and learner are not too great, so the learner feels comfortable questioning and challenging the teacher. In such cases, teaching and learning become bidirectional activities, in which “teacher” and “learner” learn from one another. Older children don’t have to be forced to play with younger ones, or vice versa, but must simply be given the opportunity to.


100% of any/all proceeds go directly back into supporting our Community Programs and providing scholarships to families that need it.